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Hampton Dene Primary School

One School, Cherishing All

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Welcome back to Spring term 2. Year 4's are swimming each Wednesday this term.
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Children's Mental Health

We embed a whole-school approach to mental health but where individuals are identified as needing further support we are able to offer Thrive delivered by Mrs Makin. We also have two trained ELSAs (Emotional Literacy Support Assistants) - Miss Warman and Mrs Lawson. The flow chart below demonstrates the process you should follow if you feel these may be appropriate for your child.

 

 

What should you do if you have concerns around your child's mental health?

The Children's Society

 

 

The Children's Society has a range of support materials for young people, parents and schools in their mental and emotional health resource 'vault' including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression and Mood
  • Loneliness
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Phobias
  • Self care
  • Emotional resilience
  • Mental Resilience

 

Coram Life Education

 

Coram Life Education has launched a free online toolkit for primary school teachers, supporting pupils’ mental health as they adjust to a new school environment post-lockdown.

The toolkit is designed to build children’s resilience, self-esteem and kindness and includes practical resources. There are also adaptations for parents and carers of children who are learning at home.

 

Guidance on Supporting Children and Young People's Mental Health - DfE

 

Helping children and young people cope with stress

There are some key points you can consider about how to support your child or young person, including:

Listen and acknowledge:

Children and young people may respond to stress in different ways. Signs may be emotional (for example, they may be upset, distressed, anxious, angry or agitated), behavioural (for example, they may become more clingy or more withdrawn, or they may wet the bed), or physical (for example, they may experience stomach aches).

Look out for any changes in their behaviour. Children and young people may feel less anxious if they are able to express and communicate their feelings in a safe and supportive environment. Children and young people who communicate differently to their peers may rely on you to interpret their feelings. Listen to them, acknowledge their concern and give them extra love and attention if they need it.

MindEd is a free online educational resource on children and young people’s mental health for all adults, which can support parents and carers through these exceptional circumstances.

 

Provide clear information about the situation:

Children and young people want to feel assured that their parents and carers can keep them safe. One of the best ways to achieve this is by talking openly about what is happening and providing honest answers to any questions they have. Explain what is being done to keep them and their loved ones safe, including any actions they can take to help. Use words and explanations that they can understand. 

 

Be aware of your own reactions:

Remember that children and young people often take their emotional cues from the important adults in their lives, so how you respond to the situation is very important. It is important to manage your own emotions and remain calm, listen to and acknowledge children and young people’s concerns, speak kindly to them, and answer any questions they have honestly. 

 

Young Minds for Parents and Carers

Young Minds provides advice about mental health and behaviour problems in children and young people up to the age of 25. You can call the Parents’ and Carers’ Helpline on 0808 802 5544. Please be aware Young Minds do not provide any direct psychological services and cannot make referrals to the NHS or Children and Young People’s Mental Health Services (CYPMHS).

Emotionally based school avoidance

NSPCC

 

Talking to a worried child

If your child is anxious or worried, there are things you can do to help. And if they're struggling with their mental health, we have advice to help you support them and keep them safe.

There's a lot of uncertainty in the world at the moment. And there won't always be answers to the questions your children are asking. But we can help you have these conversations in a safe and open way.

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